Top Organic Garden Fertilizers You Can Make

If you’re growing your own food, for sure you’re after some of the health benefits you get from your chemical free, organic produce. So why not try some organic fertilizers that you can make yourself!

If you're growing your own food, for sure you're after some of the health benefits you get from your chemical free, organic produce. So why not try some organic fertilizers that you can make yourself!

Those who don’t like the idea of adding chemicals to our environment, always try to find some organic ideas and that’s commendable. And let’s be honestly– If you are growing your own veggies, you are probably after some of the health benefits, right? Ok, and then there is the cost factor as well!

So why wouldn’t you make your own organic fertilizers for your garden, instead of buying expensive specialty products? It is easy, it is healthy for both your family and the earth at large, and it is cost effective.

Basically plants need three major nutrients to thrive, Nitrogen (N), Phosphorus (P) and Potassium (K). You might see these displayed on commercially made fertilizers in number form, for example, 10-5-5. Nitrogen is necessary for leaf and green growth, Phosphorus for flowers and fruit, and Potassium for a general health of the plant. That having been said, plants need a lot of other nutrients as well, called Micronutrients. Some of these include Magnesium, Calcium and Sulfur. Plants are also affected by the acidity of a soil, and the biodiversity of bacteria that creates a healthy environment, all of which can be improved with organic fertilizers. Now that you have the basics down of why we are doing this, let’s get down to some simple recipes for our choices for top organic garden fertilizers you can make!

1. Coffee Grounds Fertilizer

Coffee grounds is a natural fertilizer that not only adds nitrogen to poor soil, it also increases the acidity of soil. This will especially make your roses, hydrangeas, magnolias and rhodies happy!

Work up to 25% coffee grounds into the soil at the base of the plants. Coffee grounds will also improve the organic matter in the soil.

2. Banana Peel Fertilizer

High in potassium, phosphorus, and calcium, banana peels are great for flowering and fruiting plants. Simply bury a peel under the ground at the base of the plant, and allow to decompose. You can also freeze overripe bananas that you would have otherwise thrown away, and then bury next to a needy plant when needed. If you prefer to make a spray, soak a peel in water for 2-3 days, then use the water to spray plants or seedlings.

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